Europe at crossroads – 10 priorities for Europe – EU Law and Publications

Ten priorities for Europe – EU Law and Publications is a publication that discusses the past three years (the length of The Juncker Commission existence) as well as the next year and what follows next. This is an important document as it addresses the issues that plague the European Union at the moment.

The documents give us insight into legislation and initiatives the EU commission announced in 2014. It shows us where they are and what needs to be done to implement them fully. It also discusses the percentage of all legislative that were brought to fruition and the rate of those that are still just a 2014 promise.

EU

The analysis of the document

Eight (out of those ten) priorities were announced (368 out of 460 initiatives), and that means that more than eighty percent of everything they promised is already in the process. It is also important to note that 171 initiatives are already adopted or enacted. The next crucial thing to consider is the areas to which those initiatives belong.

The majority of the initiatives that affected the single digital market were presented (more than 90 percent) and 41 percent of all those got through and ended up being adopted. The percentages go down when it comes to other areas.

Another vital industry that saw little progress is the energy, where only 26 percent of all initiatives got adopted. This is an industry that needs more attention.

What can be done in one year?

Reaching the goal of the original Juncker plan in next year is almost impossible. The percentages at the moment show that minimal effort has been invested in trying to complete the project. This is why the top EU institutions chose to push some initiatives in the following year as they realize that adopting essential things is a bit more critical than passing them at random.

Those interested in politics and laws of the EU can take a look at the publication. It’s an objective and independent look at the EU, and it’s progress in this four year period.